bbz:

Because of Haiyan’s very recent devastation, please consider contributing to first-respondents efforts:

If you’re looking for someone missing in the Philippines, or if you have information about someone there, Google.org has launched the Typhoon Yolanda Person Finder. A Google crisis map has also been added to detail evacuation centers and areas designated for relief.

Charities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from around the world are responding to this disaster. Many are detailed below with how they’re providing aid and how you can help them make a difference.

Emergency support

The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) has deployed rescue and relief teams to evaluate the damage in the areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. You can donate to the Philippine Red Cross by selecting the Supertyphoon Yolanda campaign on their donation page. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and Red Cross networks from around the world are supporting the Philippine Red Cross. Many have created specific funds for this disaster, including the American Red Cross, Canadian Red Cross and the British Red Cross.

The Salvation Army is on the ground serving storm survivors, primarily with food, water and shelter. Emergency Disaster Service teams have been providing help since the typhoon hit, but are challenged by the lack of accessible roads to transport goods and medical supplies. The non-profit has set up a designated fund for Haiyan relief efforts, which you can access here. You can also make a donation by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).

The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) is working with local authorities, the Filipino Jewish community and their global partners to assist in providing for survivors’ immediate needs. You can support their efforts online or by phone at 1-212-687-6200.

CARE's emergency response teams are coordinating with local partners in the Philippines to provide food, water, shelter and health care for those in need. Their teams in Vietnam are preparing for the potential need there as Typhoon Haiyan continues its devastation. You can support CARE's efforts on their website, or by phone at 1-800-521-2273 within the United States or +1-404-681-2252 outside the U.S.

Catholic Relief Services, the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the U.S., is on the ground helping with water purification, shelter materials and essential living supplies. You can donate to the organization’s efforts online or you can call 1-877-435-7277. You can also type in your phone number on the website and a representative will call you back to take your donation.

Convoy of Hope's Global Disaster Response Team has shipping containers full of food and supplies on the way to the Philippines. The organization is preparing more supplies to be sent like canned goods, hygiene kits and water filtration units. You can visit Convoy of Hope's website to donate funds to their efforts or call 1-417-823-8998.

Mercy Corps is preparing to deliver food, water, temporary shelter and other basic supplies to devastated areas throughout the Philippines. You can support the organization by donating through their website, PayPal, or by calling 1-888-747-7440.

Oxfam America aid teams are on the ground in northern Cebu, northern and eastern Samar and Leyte, in the Eastern Visayas region in the Philippines. They’re working to provide immediate access to water and sanitation materials. You can support this effort by donating online to their Typhoon Haiyan Relief and Recovery Fund, or by phone at 1-800-776-9326.

Adventist Development and Relief Agency's (ADRA) emergency response team is working in Manila and in the province of Bohol to provide food, emergency relief and medical aid to those in need. They have launched an emergency appeal that you can support online or by phone at 1-800-424-2372.

The International Rescue Committee (IRC) has dispatched an emergency team to Manila and launched a $10 million appeal in order to ensure immediate needs like safe water, hygiene and sanitation are met. If you would like to contribute to their efforts, click here.

Operation Blessing International (OBI) has deployed disaster relief teams in multiple locations following the massive devastation from Typhoon Haiyan. The organization is providing clean water and food, emergency shelter materials and medical assistance. To help the charity’s mission, you can make a contribution on their website.

Food and water

The World Food Programme was already providing emergency food assistance in the Philippines following the October earthquake. With these emergency food stocks stretched thin, they’re now mobilizing additional supplies and are flying in 40 tons of fortified biscuits in the coming days. Additional food supplies are needed. You can help these efforts by donating online or by calling 1-202-747-0722 domestically or +39-06-65131 for international calls.

Samaritan’s Purse has sent disaster relief specialists, including water and nutrition experts, to the Philippines to deliver immediate aid. They have launched the Philippines Emergency Relief fund for this disaster, which you can support online or by phone at 1-828-262-1980.

World Vision is responding in the Philippines by first providing emergency food and clean water. They will also work to create child-friendly spaces and help families rebuild from this disaster. They have launched a Philippines Disaster Response Fund that you can support online or by calling 1-888-511-6443.

Action Against Hunger is on the ground providing drinking water and survival kits containing buckets, soap and chlorine tablets. They’re also working to distribute sanitation equipment to prevent outbreaks of waterborne diseases. They’re requesting assistance and you can help by donating online or by calling 1-877-777-1420.

Shelter

ShelterBox was already in the Philippines providing shelter after the 7.2 earthquake that hit Bohol on October 15. They are now expanding their operations to provide tents and essential equipment for families left homeless after Typhoon Haiyan. You can support their work in the Philippines either online or by calling 1-941-907-6036.

Habitat for Humanity is already providing help to 30,000 families with shelter repair kits to rebuild their damaged homes. You can support this work by donating from the Philippines to their Re-Build Philippines Fund or from the U.S. by contributing to their Disaster Response Fund. You can also make a donation by phone at 1-800-HABITAT.

Architecture for Humanity is mobilizing to assist with post-disaster reconstruction and the organization’s working with local architects to identify the most critical rebuilding needs. You can support their Super Typhoon Haiyan Response online, by calling 1-415-963-3511 or by texting REBUILD to 85944 to make a $10 donation from your mobile phone.

Medical assistance

Americares has an emergency shipment on the way to the Philippines with enough medical aid for 20,000 survivors, including antibiotics, wound care supplies and pain relievers. You can support Americares with an online donation or by calling 1-800-486-4357.

International Medical Corps has pre-positioned medical supplies and their team is on the ground coordinating with their partners in the Philippines to distribute and provide medical aid. You can support their Typhoon Haiyan Emergency Response fund online or by calling 1-800-481-4462.

More than 1.5 tons of emergency medicine and medical supplies are en route to the Philippines from Direct Relief. The supplies include antibiotics, pain relievers, nutritional supplements, antifungal medications, wound dressings and chronic disease medicines. You can call in your donation by dialing 1-805-964-4767 or you can go online to support the organization.

Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors without Borders (MSF) have emergency teams in Cebu city with an additional 50 people including medical personnel, logisticians and psychologists arriving in the Philippines in the next few days. They’ll bring tents, supplies of drugs, medical equipment and material to purify water, as well as essential plastic sheeting, cooking items and hygiene kits. Teams will monitor possible outbreaks of infectious diseases. An additional cargo is being prepared due to leave later this week from Bordeaux with an inflatable hospital and medical material. You can make your donation by calling 1-212- 763-5779 or online.

Helping children

The U.S. Fund for UNICEF is helping children and their families in the Philippines receive shelter, clean water, nutrition and vaccines. Their emergency response can be supported online or by calling 1-800-367-5437. You can also donate directly to UNICEF in the Philippines here.

Save the Children is offering disaster relief support for children in the Philippines, Laos and Vietnam after Typhoon Haiyan. The charity has pre-positioned relief material kits for children and families, which will include toiletries, household cleaning items, temporary school tents and learning materials. You can support their Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund online. You can also donate by phone at 1-800-728-3843.

Emergency response teams from ChildFund International prepositioned supplies, including emergency kits and tents, and made arrangements with local suppliers to access food and non-food relief supplies. The organization is also preparing to setup child- centered spaces where kids can feel safe. Donate to ChildFund online to help children cope and recover confidence after this disaster.

Teams from Plan are also on the ground responding to the needs of children and their families. Their priorities are vulnerable youngsters and communities in rural locations. You can support their appeal on their website.

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/09/world/iyw-how-to-help-typhoon-haiyan/index.html

(via versines)

5 months ago 50,591 notes

afracturedreality:

“Sensing Danger”

Winner of 1st Place in Nikon’s Small World in Motion Competition of 2012.

An efficient innate immune reaction is triggered when an inguinal lymph node (center) is damaged by a laser. Neutrophils, which are the most abundant type of white blood cells in mammals, are seen “rushing” to the site of damage. (Note, however, that even though this GIF loops every 2.5 seconds, what you are seeing actually occurred over a period of 13.7 minutes.) This type of response is often studied for the development of adaptive immune response.

Nikon Instruments said the movie won 1st place because it demonstrated the delicate balance between science and art. “Dr. Kamenyeva’s image is the perfect combination of cutting-edge science with aesthetics that we look for in Small World, to help raise the profile of science with scientists and non-scientists alike,” said Eric Flem, the communications manager for Nikon Instruments.

Credit: Olena Kamenyeva, National Institute of Health’s NIAID Laboratory of Immunoregulation, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

1 year ago 122 notes

If there are any high school or university students studying science (including psychology), who would like to be a member of this blog and contribute, please let me know, because I don’t have the time to post much any more, other things have taken priority. 

1 year ago

staceythinx:

This might look like lace, but its actually lichen. Photos by  i n i m i n i .

1 year ago 7,220 notes

fabledquill:

futuresoldierketchum:

livetomakeadifference:

0ut-0f-f0cus:

This is off the Bermuda Triangle,  where 16+ ships washed up on a sand bar. The mystery is still unsolved

Actually the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle has been given a scientific explanation: methane vents which have been discovered in that region. 

Methane reduces the density of water, causing ships that would normally float, to instead sink.

Methane, when in gas form, messes with the electrical components of aircraft, causing them to fail and sometimes fall right out of the sky.

Methane also causes the water to turn a ghostly greenish color, and the “ghost ships” reported to be seen are simply green reflections of the ships that scatter the bottom of the triangle.

Fucking science, man.

so

the bermuda triangle

is caused

by ocean farts

(via pumpykin)

1 year ago 707,612 notes

inhumanoid:

Welwitschia mirabilis

One of the rarest and strangest plants in the world, Welwitschia mirabilis is often referred to as an “underground tree” and can live up to 2,000 years in the arid Namib desert. It’s comprised of two leaves, a stem base and a tap root. The leaves become frayed but never stop growing and never shed, giving the plant it’s Medusa-like appearance. It uses them to collect moisture from sea fog. The long tap root can extend 6ft underground to collect water.

The only member of the Welwitschia genus, it’s thought to be a relic from the Jurassic Period, when the Earth was covered with ferns and gymnosperms, and thus a “living fossil”.

Image credits: Top | Bottom

(via scientificillustration)

1 year ago 401 notes
Hi! I just wanted to say your blog is really great Thank u :) I also wanted to let you know that God loves you more than anything. He sent His Son Jesus so we could have forgiveness thru Him & be forgiven of our sins. Jesus said that He came to "give us life & life more abundantly" John 10:10 He also said that He is the only "way, the truth, & the life" John 14:6 The good news is He loves you more than anything & is waiting for you to call on Him today. No one is too far away for salvation :)

It’s like cyberspace door knockers who try to give you leaflets with pictures of Jesus on them even though they didn’t bother to ask if you were religious at all or of what religion you belonged to.

I know he said “I am the way I am the truth I am the life”, we sung it in primary school with shitty hand actions during assembly.

Salvation is overrated.  

astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus Lybia

(Boxer Crabs)

also known as pom-pom crabs, Boxer Crabs are a genus of small crabs in the family Xanthidae (mud crabs). the name pom-pom/or boxer comes from the mutualism that they hold with sea anemones, in which they hold the cnidarian in their claws and use them for defense, and in turn the sea anemone gets more food by moving around.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Arhtropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Decapoda-Branchyura-Xanthidae-Lybia

Source,Source

(via staceythinx)

1 year ago 19,913 notes
6th
January
19 notes
Reblog
poliokitty:

look at glutamine synthetase isn’t it magicalglutamate and ammonia to glutamine this is the kind of bizarre thing they adorn lunchboxes with

poliokitty:

look at glutamine synthetase
isn’t it magical
glutamate and ammonia to glutamine
this is the kind of bizarre thing they adorn lunchboxes with

1 year ago 19 notes

staceythinx:

Some of the many branches of the nudibranch family tree. Photography by David Doubilet

1 year ago 7,705 notes